Honors Program Requirements

We tailor honors studies to each discipline, so requirements for honors coursework and the honors thesis vary from college to college. In most cases honors courses replace courses in the regular curriculum and do not add to the total number of hours required for graduation. For more information, explore the website for the honors program in your college.

Here are brief descriptions of honors program requirements for each college (click on the name of the college to access more detailed explanations of the requirements):

College of Education and Health Professions

For students with a catalog year of fall 2016 or after, the College of Education and Health Professions requires the following:

  • 18 credit hours of honors credit
  • Up to 8 hours of University Honors courses
  • At least 10 honors credits within their program of study (nursing, curriculum and instruction, etc.)
  • Written submission of the honors thesis/project to the COEHP Honors Council and oral presentation of the honors thesis to faculty and students within COEHP.

College of Engineering

Graduation with honors in the College of Engineering requires a minimum of 12 hours of honors courses, with at least 6 in engineering, plus an honors thesis. Individual departments require specific courses selected from a menu of courses within the major.

Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences

Graduation with honors in the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences requires a minimum of 15 hours honors coursework, including 9-12 hours of honors courses in Bumpers College and/or other colleges on campus, plus 3-6 hours of thesis/project credits with a faculty mentor.

Fay Jones School of Architecture + Design

Graduation with honors in the Fay Jones School of Architecture + Design requires 18 hours of honors coursework. All honors students will pursue a capstone project during the final year of their undergraduate program.

J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences

The J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences offers two forms of honors:

  • Students in the College Honors program complete roughly  one-third of their coursework at the honors level. Honors hours are taken from the honors core, honors colloquia, and research hours, including the thesis. (See link above for specifics.) Through coursework or examination students demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English (intermediate level). Entering freshmen are expected to participate in the College Honors program.
  • The Departmental Honors program allows the flexibility to take honors courses from a variety of areas befitting the student's schedule. Students complete at least 12 hours of honors coursework in residence and develop and defend a thesis. The Departmental Honors program is intended for students who enter honors after the first semester of their freshman year and students who transfer into the University with more than 24 hours.

Both college and departmental honors students must:

  • Complete honors coursework in residence
  • Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.50
  • Complete undergraduate research culminating in an honors thesis project

Sam M. Walton College of Business

The Sam M. Walton College of Business offers two forms of honors:

  • Walton Scholars complete 17 hours in honors courses from Walton College and University core as well as Calculus I and 12 honors hours in junior/senior level Walton College honors courses (2 honors colloquia, Honors Business Strategy and Planning, and thesis), and demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English (intermediate level).
  • Departmental Scholars complete 9 hours in honors courses from Walton College and University core as well as Calculus I and 12 honors hours in junior/senior level Walton College honors courses (2 honors colloquia, Honors Business Strategy and Planning, and thesis), and demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English (intermediate level).

Questions? Contact the honors program director in your college.